At Yalta What Agreement Did The Big Three Come To About Germany`s Future After Ww2

The Potsdam Conference is perhaps best known for President Truman`s meeting with Stalin on July 24, 1945, during which the President announced to the Soviet leader that the United States had successfully detonated the first atomic bomb on July 16, 1945. Historians have often interpreted Truman`s somewhat firm attitude during the negotiations to mean that the U.S. negotiating team believed that the U.S. nuclear capabilities would strengthen its bargaining power. Stalin, however, was already well informed about the American nuclear program thanks to the Soviet secret services; he stood his ground in his positions. This situation has made negotiations difficult. The leaders of the United States, Britain and the Soviet Union, who had remained allies during the war despite their differences, never met collectively again to discuss cooperation in post-war reconstruction. Yalta was the second of three major war conferences among the Big Three. It was preceded by the Tehran Conference in November 1943, followed by the Potsdam Conference in July 1945, preceded by a conference in Moscow in October 1944, in which President Roosevelt did not participate, during which Churchill and Stalin had spoken about European Western and Soviet spheres of influence. [1] Four months after Roosevelt`s death, on August 6, 1945, President Truman ordered the dropping of a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima. On March 1, Roosevelt assured Congress: “I come from Crimea with the firm conviction that we have begun to enter a world of peace.” [23] However, the Western powers soon realized that Stalin would not keep his promise of free elections for Poland. After receiving considerable criticism in London after Yalta of the atrocities committed by Soviet troops in Poland, Churchill wrote a desperate letter to Roosevelt in which he referred to the large-scale deportations and liquidations of opposition Poles by the Soviets. [23] On March 11, Roosevelt replied to Churchill and wrote, “I am sure we must stand firm on a correct interpretation of Crimea`s decision.

They rightly believe that neither the government nor the people of this country will support participation in fraud or mere deception by the Lublin government, and the solution must be as we imagined it in Yalta. [24] Despite many disagreements, Allied leaders managed to reach some agreements in Potsdam.